December 27, 2018: Danish Study Investigates Effects of Breed Specific Legislation

A newly- published Danish study has found that Breed Specific Legislation (BSL) has a limited effect on overall levels of dog bite injuries and summarizes that: “In order to minimise dog bite injuries in the future, it would seem that other interventions or non-breed-specific legislation should be considered as the primary option.” Read study

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The Inefficacy of BSL

By BARKS from the Guild The Pet Professional Guild (PPG) is becoming increasingly alarmed at the number of dogs being seized or banned in a variety of communities worldwide based purely on their breed or appearance, allegedly in the interest of public safety. At the same time, there is little, if any, assessment of an individual dog’s behavior or environment, […]

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What the Experts Say about BSL

By BARKS from the Guild Scientists, canine behavior and training professionals, animal welfare associations and veterinary behavior bodies worldwide have all contributed to the debate surrounding Breed Specific Legislation (BSL), and much literature is available detailing the reasons why it has been shown to be ineffective in dog bite prevention and improving the safety of the public at large. In […]

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September 10, 2018: New Study Discusses Genetic Breed Heritage Testing of Shelter Dogs

Authors conclude that: “…when we consider the complexity of shelter dog breed heritage and the failure to identify multiple breeds based on visual identification coupled with our inability to predict how these breeds then interact within an individual dog, we believe that focusing resources on communicating the physical and behavioral characteristics of shelter dogs would best support adoption efforts.” Read study. […]

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August 12, 2018: New Study of Red Fox Genome Assembly Finds Candidate Gene for Tame Behaviour

The study, Red fox genome assembly identifies genomic regions associated with tame and aggressive behaviours, finds a “strong positional candidate gene for tame behaviour” in the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), noting that the fox represents “a powerful model for the genetic analysis of affiliative and aggressive behaviours that can benefit genetic studies of behaviour in dogs and other mammals, including humans.” Read study.

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